What It’s Like Explaining Depression To Your Asian Parents

For the longest time, I’ve wanted to write a post about what it is like to have Chinese parents who aren’t supportive of the fact that I have mental illnesses. I never did because it is a very painful and difficult subject for me to broach.

Maybe some day, I’ll be able to approach this topic with more strength than I have right now and be able to talk about it.

Thankfully, for now, someone else has done it in comic form. Everything in it is true – everything that I have personally heard myself are in the comic.

So if you’ve ever wondered how Asian parents treat their mentally ill children, look no further than here:

What It’s Like Explaining Depression To Your Asian Parents

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8 thoughts on “What It’s Like Explaining Depression To Your Asian Parents

  1. mentalbreakinprogress says:

    Hey Jules! 🙂 (((hugs))) I’m glad you took this step to bring light to a very real issue. ❤ Not all cultures are excepting of mental illness and this can make seeking proper treatment very difficult. I'm gonna have a read right now! Thanks for sharing and I hope all is well ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • JL says:

      Thanks Cavelle. I still feel a lot of fear from it though. It’s weird but I feel like any time now my parents will find this post and be angry at me – even though, they *do* do those things. I don’t know, it feels complicated… I want to talk about it, but I’m scared to. And really, I don’t even know what I’m scared of. Isn’t that weird? Anyway, thanks for commenting. It means a lot to me! (hug)

      Liked by 1 person

      • mentalbreakinprogress says:

        Just read the article and I think they did a good job educating others on the issue. You know, maybe you should just write a draft of what you would like to say and hang on to it 🙂 I think it makes sense to be scared to discuss something publicly that your parents may not understand and find upsetting, however, I think you could help a lot of people who are in the same situation. You may not be ready right now and that’s OK 🙂 ❤ The right time will present itself and when it does, you're going to kick ass 😉 (((hugs)))

        Liked by 1 person

      • JL says:

        That’s a good point. I do recognize that a huge part of me still want their recognition and affirmation despite knowing that I might never get it. S and I have talked about this a lot and he has told me multiple times that I need to learn to self affirm and that it’s ok to feel the way I do towards my parents because they *have* made me feel abandoned/rejected. But you’re also right in saying that this may help someone else in the same situation. If you’ll notice, there aren’t many Asians who are writing about their mental illnesses even though a lot of Asians do suffer from it (South Korea has one of the highest rates of suicides for example). And I think writing that draft might be a great idea! It might be just the thing I need to let go of this side of me that needs that parental affirmation. Thanks Cavelle, *hugs*.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mentalbreakinprogress says:

        You are most welcome Jules! 🙂 You’re bang on. I live in Vancouver, BC and the Asian population here is 43%. This is an untapped topic as I have seen first hand just how hush hush the topic of mental illness is in the Asian community. In my opinion there is no need to live in shame. Daily life is hard enough on a good day. You’ve overcome your fears before….I still think of the coffee house 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • JL says:

        You’re always such a lifesaver! 🙂 I hope you know that and that what you say and do for others really matter. Yes… That’s why people just often choose suicide because they can’t talk about it or seemingly no one cares. I’ve never ever heard my parents tell me “I love you” to me until after I left home for college in 2005. It wasn’t until I was gone for a long time that they finally said “Love you” and not even the full 3 words. Just those two words. But yeah, I think it’s probably the shame that drives my fear. Good point. You’re right. I have overcome quite a bit this year. I think I need to keep remembering that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mentalbreakinprogress says:

        Totally ❤ I know I haven't been around as much lately but just know I always love our chats. It's been so nice to find like-minded people here. Lol I'm not sure I'm a lifesaver but I like to help and meeting others who like to do the same is a nice break from the chaotic world we all live in right now ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • JL says:

        Yes you are. At least you’ve saved *me* on many occasions and I’ll always be grateful for that. I find the blogosphere to be pretty quiet lately. I wonder if it’s just because people are just busy with their holiday plans and stuff to be blogging but I have missed a lot of people that I used to regularly talk to. I know you’ve been busy as well with Dexter and all. 😉 So I’m appreciative of all the times that I do get to read posts from you or chat with you. 🙂

        Like

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